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Patent: To Make a Lure To Lure A Fish Like Live Bait
Patent:  To Make a Lure To Lure A Fish Like Live Bait | dal_ftw_txbz, Mark Pack, Emory, patent, 8181382, fishing lure, Texas, invention,

Mark Pack of Emory, Texas recently received U.S. Patent 8,181,382 for “Fishing Lure.”

Texas Business Patent of the Day:  The early bird may get the worm, but a Rains County man has devised a better worm to catch a fish.

Mark Pack of Emory, Texas recently received U.S. Patent 8,181,382 for “Fishing Lure.”

Pack applied for the patent more than five years ago on September 28, 2006.

The patent assignee is Lake Fork Trophy Bait & Tackle of Emory, Texas.

Pack’s invention relates generally to fishing gear, and more specifically to fishing lures that have realistic motion, according to the patent document.  

Fishing is enjoyed around the world. From professional fishermen to the weekend fishermen, there has been a constant search for an ideal lure. This ideal lure would simulate live bait in all of its attributes, such as the way live bait looks, the way it smells, and, most particularly, the way in which live bait moves through the water. 

There have been many lures that have attempted to simulate this movement of live bait through the water.  However, these lures do not do a realistic job of imitating the movements of live bait. Pack saw a need for a new lure with a more realistic imitation of the actions of live bait.


One aspect of Pack’s invention includes a fishing lure that has a head section, a mid-section, and a tail section. The mid-section has one or more segments that are interconnected by one or more connectors that allow the segments to rotate relative to each other and to the head and tail section to which they are attached. 

Another aspect of Pack’s invention includes a fishing lure comprising a first section with a longitudinal axis and a central plane that extends vertically from the longitudinal axis. A second section is comprised of one or more segments, with each segment being connected by multiple sets of grooves that allow one segment to rotate in relation to an adjacent segment. A third section is connected to the second section on an opposing end from the first section. 

Yet another aspect of Pack’s invention includes a fishing lure with a head section, a tail section on an opposing end of the lure from the head section, and a mid-section. The mid-section is interposed between the head and tail section, and is comprised of one or more segments that are interconnected to the other segments and the other sections by one or more connectors that allow the segments to rotate. The overall shape of the fishing lure is in the shape of a live animal. 

By using these features in a fishing lure, the fishing lure will move through the water in a fashion that realistically imitates the motions of a live animal. This will attract more fish to the lure, and make it more effective in catching the desired type of fish. The shape of the fishing lure in one embodiment is a shad baitfish. Other embodiments include the overall shape of a lizard, a waterdog salamander, a blue gill fish, a goby fish, or a snake or worm.