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Patent: To Play a MultiPlayer Game.
Patent: To Play a MultiPlayer Game.  | dal_ftw_txbz, aust_txbz, J. Todd Coleman,James L. Nance,Josef Hall, Cedar Park, patent,8182320, Collectable Card-Based Game, Massively Multiplayer Role-Playing Game,MMORPG,  

The three applied for the patent almost three years ago on May 29, 2009. 

The patent assignee is KingsIsle Entertainment Incorporated of Dallas.

J. Todd Coleman and James L. Nance, both of Austin, and Josef Hall of Cedar Park, recently received U.S. Patent 8,182,320 for “Collectable Card-Based Game in a Massively Multiplayer Role-Playing Game.”

Texas Patent of the Day:  Role-playing games have come a long, winding and technical journey since the rise of Dungeons and Dragons in 1974 played with dice and notes. Three Texans devised and patented one of the newest wave of role-playing games.

J. Todd Coleman and James L. Nance, both of Austin, and Josef Hall of Cedar Park, recently received U.S. Patent 8,182,320 for “Collectable Card-Based Game in a Massively Multiplayer Role-Playing Game.”

The three applied for the patent almost three years ago on May 29, 2009. 

The patent assignee is KingsIsle Entertainment Incorporated of Dallas.

The invention relates to evaluating systems, software, and computer implemented methods and, more particularly, to presenting gaming aspects in three dimensions, according to the patent document.

A massively multiplayer online role playing game (MMORPG) is an online computer or console game in which a large number of players interact with one another in a virtual world. As in other role playing games (RPGs), players assume the role of a character and take control over most of that character's actions. The virtual world may be a fantasy setting, a science fiction universe, or the old west. 

The popularity of multiplayer games may trace back to Dungeons & Dragons or even tabletop war games.  The beginning of massively multiplayer online role playing games may be traced back to the multi-user dungeon (MUD) internet games, which were text-based multiplayer games typically using a command line interface. However, with the rising acceptance of personal computers, as well as increased graphical capabilities of personal computers and video game consoles, massively multiplayer online role playing games have become wildly popular around the world. In fact, part of the draw of massively multiplayer online role playing games is that players from any continent can typically be online at any given time. 

MMORPGs distinguish from single-player or small multi-player role playing games by the game's persistent world. The persistent world is hosted by one or more servers and the state of the world continues to exist and evolve even when a given player is not logged in. Persistent worlds may also include non-player characters (NPCs), marketplaces, auction houses, buildings, animals, monsters, vehicles, etc. This results in a game world that is far more dynamic, diverse, realistic, and immersive than those of other games. 

Players of persistent world games tend to invest a great deal of time in their online characters. The player is considered online when the player is logged into the game server through a game client. Conversely, a player is considered offline when the player is not logged into the game server through a game client. A typical player performs tasks, such as completing quests, practicing skills or crafts, obtaining items, fighting monsters, buying or selling items, to improve the attributes or status of the character. 
 
The three Texans invented a massively multiplayer online role playing game (MMORPG) or, more specifically, a card-based MMORPG that enables characters in a virtual world to collect cards representing specified actions or powers and presents three-dimensional (3D) elements to players representing one or more aspects associated with the characters and environment. 

For example, a computer program product for managing an online game is stored on a tangible computer-readable medium and comprises instructions operable when executed to cause a processor to identify, for each of a plurality of characters in an online game, cards collected by an associated character in a virtual world, where each card represents an action executable by the associated character. The instructions further present the plurality of characters as three-dimensional figures in the virtual world and receive a selection of at least one card for each of the plurality of characters during duels in the virtual world. The card indicates an action executed in the virtual world. The instructions further cause the processor to automatically determine, for each of the plurality of characters, an effect of the at least one selected card and present, in real time, a physical manifestation of the effect associated with each of the plurality of characters using one or more three-dimensional elements in the virtual world. 

In another example, a computer program product for presenting information in an online game using computer-readable instructions is stored on a tangible computer-readable medium and comprises instructions operable when executed to cause a processor to identify, for one of a plurality of characters in an online game, state information associated with the one of the plurality of characters during a combat in a virtual world; present, in the virtual world, at least one three-dimensional object representing the state information, the at least one three-dimensional object presented proximate the one of the plurality of characters in the virtual world; receive information updating the state information of the one of the plurality of characters; and dynamically modify, in real time, a presentation of the at least one three-dimensional object to represent the updated state information. In some situations, the state information includes a current state of the combat. Often, the particular three-dimensional object is viewable by each client associated with the plurality of characters in the virtual world. 

In a further example, a computer program product for evaluating combat in an online game using computer-readable instructions, the computer program product is stored on a tangible computer-readable medium and comprising instructions operable when executed to cause a processor to receive from a plurality of characters in an online game selections of cards representing actions performed on targets. The instructions identify values of parameters associated with the plurality of characters and the targets and determine effects on the targets based, at least in part, on the identified values and the performed actions. The instructions further cause the processor to automatically update one or more attributes of the targets in accordance with the determined effects. 

In yet another example, the computer program product for chatting in an online game using computer-readable instructions, the computer program product stored on a tangible computer-readable medium comprises instructions operable when executed to cause a processor to identify a plurality of characters in an online game and associate chat levels and identify one or more rules for evaluating dialogue associated with the plurality of characters. The instructions further receive dialogue from one of the players controlling one of the plurality of characters and filter the received dialogue based, at least in part, on the identified chat levels and the one or more rules. In some cases, filtering comprises identifying an entered word as a word to remove prior to presentation to other characters and dynamically updating the word selected for removal with an approved word for presentation to other characters in the virtual world. Filtering the received dialogue also comprises comparing the received dialogue to a list of profane terms associated with one or more specified chat levels and replacing prohibited terms with character strings prior to presenting the dialogue to other characters in the one or more specified chat levels. Each of the plurality of characters presents a graphical element indicating a chat level associated with the player. Filtering the received dialogue comprises comparing the received dialogue to a list of unacceptable terms associated with a particular chat level; dynamically updating one or more attributes of the received dialogue based, at least in part, on the received dialogue matching the acceptable terms so that the particular player can view the unacceptable term in real-time; and automatically presenting filtered text, based on the unacceptable term, to other players as the dialogue is received from particular player. One updated attribute includes a new color for the unacceptable term.