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Patent: To Put Your Brain In A Box
Patent: To Put Your Brain In A Box | aust_txbz, hou_txbz, Thomas A. Visel, Vijay Divar, Lukas K. Womack Matthew Fettig, Gene P. Hamilton, patent, 8001067, Method, Substituting, Electronic Emulation, Human Brain, application, replace, human,

Thomas A. Visel, Vijay Divar, Lukas K. Womack Matthew Fettig and Gene P. Hamilton, all of Austin, received U.S. Patent 8,001,067 for “Method for Substituting an Electronic Emulation of the Human Brain into an Application to Replace a Human.”

Texas Business Patent Of The Day:  Five Texans have devised a way to put your brain in a box.  Rather, a simulation of your brain into software.

Thomas A. Visel, Vijay Divar, Lukas K. Womack Matthew Fettig and Gene P. Hamilton, all of Austin, received U.S. Patent 8,001,067 for “Method for Substituting an Electronic Emulation of the Human Brain into an Application to Replace a Human.”

The five filed for the patent almost five years ago on April 7, 2007.

The patent assignee is Neuric Technologies LLC of Houston.

The Austin inventors’ patent pertains in general to artificial intelligence and, more particularly, to replacing a human in an application specific environment. 

In certain applications, a human is required in order to assess the conditions surrounding the operation of particular system or the execution of a certain task and to determine the progress of the task or covered conditions in the system have changed, according to the patent document.

Once an observation is made by a user, based upon that user's experience and information, there can be some type of action taken. For example, it might be that a user would make a change to the system in order to maintain the system in a particular operating range, this being the task of that individual.

Further, it might be that the user is tasked to achieve certain results with the system. In this situation, the user would take certain actions, monitor the operations, i.e., the surrounding environment, and then take additional actions if necessary or to ensure that the tasks are achieved.

This also the case with military operations wherein multiple individuals might be involved in carrying out of military mission. In this situation, multiple individuals, each having their own expertise, would be given a certain task that, when operating in concert, would be achieved-tasks of achieving a certain military goal.

However, each of these individuals, although having a certain amount of specific training, also has the ability to make decisions that are not directly accorded to their experience in training.

For example, if an unknown factor entered into the mission, i.e., a previously unknown obstacle occurs, an individual has the background to make a decision, though this decision is made based upon prior experience in different areas that the human might have. 

Sometimes an expert system is supposed to operate a particular system to take the place of the human. These expert systems are trained based upon an expert human wherein that human is presented with certain conditions and the actions are recorded. Whenever those conditions exist with respect to the expert system, the expert system will take the same actions.

However, if conditions exist that were not part of the training dataset for the expert system, the results would be questionable, as there is no basis upon which to make such a decision by the expert system. 

The present invention disclosed and claimed herein comprises a method for emulating human behavior and actions in an expert mode to control and execute a defined task. The first step is to define a task based application having a task associated therewith that is operable to receive goals and conditions and which goals define the desired results to be achieved when the task is performed.

Inputs are provided to the task based application for controlling the operation thereof, and information as to the state of the task based application is received from the task based application.

A brain emulation is represented by a plurality of nodes each representing a concept, and interconnecting relationships between select ones of the concepts, which brain emulation is operable to receive information from the task based application and process such information and capable of controlling the task based application with the outcome of such processing to achieve the goal of the task based application.

The brain emulation is trained in a training mode to establish the relationships between concepts in response to training information input thereto that is designed to impart predetermined meaning to the one or more concepts in the brain emulation.

After training, the brain emulation receives information either directly from a external source or from the task based application as to the state of the task based application and processes the received information based on the existing interconnecting relationships to initiate the task associated with the task based application and attempt to achieve the goal associated with the task based application.