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Patent: To Puzzle & Play Your Way To Math Mastery
Patent: To Puzzle & Play Your Way To Math Mastery | dal_ftw_txbz, Frisco,math,logic,James E. Caster,patent, 8205886,didactic, puzzle, skill, develop,

James E. Caster Jr. of Frisco, Texas, recently received U.S. Patent 8,205,886 for “Didactic Skill Developing Puzzle.”

Texas Business Patent of the Day:  A Texas man has devised a game to help kids learn math and logic.

James E. Caster Jr. of Frisco, Texas, recently received U.S. Patent 8,205,886 for “Didactic Skill Developing Puzzle.”

Caster applied for the patent more than two years ago on May 21, 2010.

Caster’s patent generally relates to a didactic skill developing puzzle with logic development and mathematical skill development features, according to the patent documents.

Caster saw a need for a tactile puzzle and a system for improving logic and mathematical skills in users, such as users from age eight to adulthood.

He saw a need for a puzzle that can be assembled from a plurality of parts using snap fit connections, which can promote a message while providing a single functional version for problem solving.

In addition, he saw a need exists for a puzzle usable by vision impaired people that can provide a "smellable" feature while providing a complex math problem and a tactile puzzle. The invention can enable vision impaired people to enjoy the puzzle and to be able to solve two puzzles simultaneously by using ropes embedded with two different smells.

His invention is a didactic skill developing puzzle having a center segment with a first end and a second end, a right side large loop, a right side small loop, a left side large loop, a left side small loop, and at least one continuous loop of material is described herein. The right side large loop can have a first snap connection, and the right side small loop can have a second snap connection. The first snap connection can removeably engage the second snap connection through the first web to form a first connected end. The left side has an identical pair of large and small loops and connections for engaging the second web to form a connected second end. The loops do not touch, and a continuous loop of material with an openable clasp is positioned between the loops allowing a user to experience a three dimensional maze.